This is more than heart care. This is life care.

At CHI Health Heart, we believe healthy hearts help power happier, more rewarding lives. That’s why we’re redefining the future of heart care. We’re imagining new ways to repair broken hearts – and keep healthy ones beating strong – with more heart specialists and more locations throughout Nebraska, southwest Iowa and northern Kansas.

Conditions We Treat

As the region’s largest provider of overall cardiac services, CHI Health Heart provides a wide range of services, including specialty referrals, preventive cardiology and sophisticated diagnostic and treatment services. Here are some of the many conditions we have experience in treating:

  • Aortic Disease
  • Arrhythmias
  • Atrial Fibrillation
  • Cardiomyopathy
  • High Cholesterol
  • Coronary Artery Disease
  • Heart Attack (Myocardial Infarction)
  • Heart Failure
  • Heart Murmurs
  • Heart Valve Diseases
  • High Blood Pressure (Hypertension)
  • Mitral Valve Prolapse

Heart Care Milestones

The beat of innovation

For more than 50 years, our heart specialists have been pioneering the most advanced heart care in the region.

1961
1987
1991
1993
1999
2002
2003
2004
2010
2011
2013
2014
2015
2015
1961
1987
1991
1993
1999
2002
2003
2004
2010
2011
2013
2014
2015
2015
Cardiac program at Creighton University founded
Nebraska Heart Institute formed
First in the state to perform Coronary Atherectomy
First to use a bare metal stent
Among the first to perform transradial (wrist) catheterizations
First to administer radiation via brachytherapy (radiation inside the stent)
First to use a drug-eluting stent (Cordis Cypher Stent and Taxus Study DES commercially)
First to use the thoracoscopic maze procedure to treat atrial fibrillation
First in the region to offer code chill
First in Nebraska to implement transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR)
First in the region to offer newer tools and techniques for chronic total occlusions (CTO) that allow patients to avoid open-heart surgeries
First in the region to offer MitraClip
First in Nebraska to insert the SYNERGY coronary stent
First in the region to implant the Watchman device for stroke risk reduction

Know the Signs of Heart Attack

Call 911 immediately if you or someone you know experiences these signs.

Discomfort or pain in the chest

Chest discomfort is generally the most reported heart attack symptom, especially among men. It typically starts in the center of the chest, often radiating to other body areas. This discomfort or pain is usually described as a tightness or heaviness, often accompanied by a burning sensation. It may last continuously or intermittently.

If you or someone you know is experiencing chest discomfort, call 911 immediately and follow up with a cardiology specialist.

Discomfort or pain in other body areas

Although chest pain is the leading indicator, other body parts can also be affected, especially among women. These generally include one or both arms, the neck, back, jaws or even stomach. Pain in these areas may come and go, or it may come suddenly and persist. If so, call 911 immediately.

Shortness of breath

We all get winded after various physical activities, such as exercising, manual labor and even climbing stairs. When shortness of breath occurs at rest, however, it’s time to take notice. In this case, stop, sit or lie down and call 911 if breathing issues continue for more than two minutes.

Nausea, sweating or clamminess

Often, initial heart attack symptoms can actually feel like flu symptoms, especially among women. Watch for sudden nausea, sweating for no reason and clamminess of the skin. If these conditions persist, call 911.

Sudden weakness, fatigue or lightheadedness

Everyone gets tired at various points during the day. But if sudden weakness or fatigue sets in, it could be another subtle sign of heart failure. Call 911 immediately.

Discomfort or pain in the chest

Chest discomfort is generally the most reported heart attack symptom, especially among men. It typically starts in the center of the chest, often radiating to other body areas. This discomfort or pain is usually described as a tightness or heaviness, often accompanied by a burning sensation. It may last continuously or intermittently.

If you or someone you know is experiencing chest discomfort, call 911 immediately and follow up with a cardiology specialist.

Discomfort or pain in other body areas

Although chest pain is the leading indicator, other body parts can also be affected, especially among women. These generally include one or both arms, the neck, back, jaws or even stomach. Pain in these areas may come and go, or it may come suddenly and persist. If so, call 911 immediately.

Shortness of breath

We all get winded after various physical activities, such as exercising, manual labor and even climbing stairs. When shortness of breath occurs at rest, however, it’s time to take notice. In this case, stop, sit or lie down and call 911 if breathing issues continue for more than two minutes.

Nausea, sweating or clamminess

Often, initial heart attack symptoms can actually feel like flu symptoms, especially among women. Watch for sudden nausea, sweating for no reason and clamminess of the skin. If these conditions persist, call 911.

Sudden weakness, fatigue or lightheadedness

Everyone gets tired at various points during the day. But if sudden weakness or fatigue sets in, it could be another subtle sign of heart failure. Call 911 immediately.

Helping an avid runner return to an active life

Video Screenshot
Play Button

Patient Charles Williams shares how a Left Ventricular Assist Device (LVAD) has helped him get back to the life he enjoyed before heart disease slowed him down.

Is heart disease killing you right now?

Video Screenshot
Play Button

There’s a reason heart disease is sometimes called the “silent killer.” Cardiologist Aimen Smer explains the risk factors that can lead to heart disease. It's important to know the risks to avoid heart disease.

7 Simple Steps to a Healthier Heart and Mind

Preventing stroke or cardiovascular disease is easier than you think. These simple steps, developed by the American Heart Association, will not only keep your heart healthy, but they can also improve your brain’s cognitive aging.

Life’s Simple 7 by the American Heart Association

Manage Blood
Pressure
Control
Cholesterol
Reduce
Blood Sugar
Get
Active
Eat
Better
Lose
Weight
Stop
Smoking
Read More

Hear Dr. Gina Mentzer explain how to adopt Life’s Simple 7 into your daily routine.

Video Screenshot
Play Button
Close

Your Browser is Out of Date

The browser you are using is currently out of date and this site may not display correctly. Please update your browser.

We recommend the Google Chrome, Mozilla Firefox or Microsoft Edge browsers.